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Horse sex Dog sex Animal sex Animal Sex Zoo Tube 365 - the best horse sex and dog sex video site.Here you can find a lot of beastiality videos full of horse porn, dog porn and any other animal porn video you could imagine. Become a member for free (instant registration) and submit your own horse sex, dog sex or animal sex videos, rate the beastiality vids you watched and join the community. If you get shacked* off your pip, you get barrelled* off your nut. It can also mean scoring with a member of the opposite sex, as in ‘Brian only* pulled into Susan on Tuesday night.’ PULL YOUR WIRE Masturbate. They do sometimes look similar to rats, and are viewed in the same way, if not worse. SKYFIE (skay-fee) A slice, or a piece of something, especially an orange. SNOEK Long narrow fish with sharp teeth found off Cape Town. Smoked snoek can be eaten as is, which is delicious, or served in a dish called ‘smoorsnoek, which tastes better than it sounds. This is not a fish, but a noun or verb referring to extreme stinginess. While also used for its global meaning, as an apology, South Africans have managed to mutate it further. STOP, Stoppe (stôp, stôp-pe) A sausage-shaped parcel of dope wrapped in newspaper or brown paper. STUKKEND (stuhk-uhnt) Broken, ruined, finished, wrecked (Afrikaans). SUKKEL (suhk-kel) Afrikaans – Struggle, have difficulty with. You never know what you’re going to get when you buy a bottle. If you take off on the wedge, you get loads of speed and can hit the lip with lots of force. ‘Hey bru*, I’m lank* thirsty, lets grab a wettie.’ WHAT FOR Aggressive act. If your friend has just parked a tiger* over the side of your car, you would call indignantly ‘What kind? ‘That oke* tuned* me “what what”.’ WILDSIDE Exposed coast, usually facing the predominant swell direction. ’ If you use this form of greeting, bru*, you are la-a-a-ank* cool. YURRUH (yuh-r-ruh) Similar to yissus, from the Afrikaans pronunciation of ‘Here’ (hear-er), meaning Lord, or God. RAT Not a furry creature with a long tail, but youngsters who surf, many of them beginners. SNART Piece of snot stuck to one’s face after a duck dive*. The amped* excitement and stoke fades when a long drive reveals no surf. STYLING When you’re styling, everything clicks into place and you find yourself surfing like Kelly Slater, Tom Curren and ‘insert-favourite-surfer-here’ rolled into one. A disappointed surfer will choon*, ‘Swak bru*, the surf is pap*.’ SWAZI REDS Potent cannabis vintage from Swaziland. TASSIES (tuss-ees) A cheap red wine called Tassenberg. For many, Tassies evokes memories of beach parties and a sand-caked babalas*. TECHNICOLOURED YAWN, see bark the dog THAT TIME Nostalgic glimpse into the past. This pushes up the wave in the middle, forming an A-framed wedge. ‘Bru*, we ended up way west.’ WETTIE A drink, refreshment. YOOIT (yoyt) When a bru* checks another bru across the street, he tunes*: ‘Yooit! IN THE EYES Exposed, sticking out like sore thumb, vulnerable. In small swell, the waves will break on the inside. ) Conversational word used widely in response to anything. ’ If you don’t feel like talking to a dik* ou* at a braai*, but don’t wish to appear rude, just say ‘is it’ at appropriate gaps in his description of how he decapitated a kudu with his bare hands. The town is similar to Torquay in Australia, home to big-name surf brands near a world-class wave. MARMITE Not to be confused with its poor Australian cousin vegemite, Marmite is a salty yeast and vegetable extract resembling burnt engine oil mixed with treacle. ‘He went to score a bankie* from his mert.’ MIELIE PAP, see pap MIF, same as sif* MISSION Hassle, schlep. If you have just heard that a South African won the world surfing champs, you would say, ‘Nooit! OFF ITS FACE, see ballistic OKE, OU, (oak, oh) Guy, chap, bloke. ’ PARK A TIGER, see bark the dog PAVEMENT What Americans call a sidewalk, we call a pavement. Not a tropical disease, just a general ‘Hey like’ lethargy brought on by the mind-stewing quality of the local ‘herbs’. A more descriptive way of saying ‘I slipped and fell on my bottom’ is ‘I slipped and saw my ring.’ This has a better ring to it. Often pertains to an uncouth person or dodgy neighbourhood. ‘I got such a rush riding that 15-foot barrel* at the Crayfish Factory.’ SAMO0SA (suh-moor-suh) Deep-fried triangular curried pie. ‘Don’t be a wuss, it’s only a six-foot puff adder that’s chewing on your leg.’ YISLAAIK (yuhss-like) A variation of yissus. ‘He hums like a skunk.’ HUNDREDS Good, excellent, enjoyable. When it’s a 12-foot day at Crayfish Factory you don’t really want to spend time there. You would be too if your hair stood up like a fizzed furball and your eyes blazed like blinking red beacons. At some breaks, there are a number of reefs or sandbars, some further out than others. ‘The surf is jacking*.’ ‘Supers jacked to six foot in an hour.’ 2. Jeffreys Bay, the Mecca of surfing in South Africa. ‘We’re going surfing now now.’ (We’re about to go surfing, depending on when the video ends and how long it takes to put on the roof racks, get petrol, and stop at the shop). Many a nostalgic surfer will remember the days they lay on the beach with friends around a fire wrapped around a bottle of OBs. You say to someone with obscure reasons for doing something, ‘What’s your plak? ‘He was on a plak when he dived off the roof.’ (He was on a weird trip when he dived off the roof.) POEPOL (poep-all) Idiot, twit. POES Used in same way as c**t and it means the same thing. (Don’t be nasty.) POINT BREAK A reef that juts out from the land around which waves bend and break. PONDOLAND FEVER After chilling out for any length of time on the Wild Coast, you risk contracting Pondoland Fever. RHINO CHASER Not a person who runs after large terrestrial mammals, but a big-wave board, something long enough and strong enough to handle a macking* bomb*. ‘I dropped my rods* and flashed* my ring.’ Also used as a more general term for the human bottom. You don’t tell anyone you’re on the way, you just rock up. ‘I dropped my rods and flashed a brown eye*.’ ROFF (r-rôf) Rough. See cool Port Elizabeth author Hagen Engler’s book Life’s a Beach. ‘That was such a rop wave.’ RUSH Spurt of adrenalin, thrill. Alternatively, your lover might be a skrik, but that’s not so lekker*. ‘You guys have left out a span of words in your slang dictionary Ek sê*! Sometimes, when you get tubed, you get spat out with a burst of spray when compressed air caught in the swirling cylinder is suddenly released. SPEW, see bark the dog SPONGE, see booger, doormat SPOOK AND DIESEL Cane spirits and Coke. ‘Skay* bru*, that baboon looks woes.’ WORSE Very stoned or drunk. ’ WUSS, WUSSY (woess, woes-see) Wimp, pansie, naff, weakling.

If you are facing the wave, you’re surfing frontside. ‘This chow is kiff ek sê*.’ ‘I just had such a kiff wave.’ Can be pronounced keef (drawing out the syllable). ‘You have lank* marcha* for the larny* kittes ek sê*.’ KLAP (klup) Hit, slap (Afrikaans). ‘Ek sal jou a snotklap gee.’ (I will hit you hard enough to make the snot fly.) ‘Let’s klap another Klippies*.’ KLIPPIES AND COKE Brandy and Coke. ‘He’s such a larny.’ ‘You are wearing larny clothes.’ ‘Why are you dressed so larny? Down in the Eastern Cape, when the party is ripping, and everyone starts getting all soppy and sentimental, they might start calling each other ‘legends’. You cook your boerewors*, steak, lamb chops and sosaties* on a grid over the flames. You eat mielie pap*, salads, rolls and other stuff. A goofed action is when you do something stupid because you’re goofed*. Rabid racists in the past have miraculously become PC. Usually induced by adrenalin, feeling wired or high on fear, either before paddling into a huge ocean, or the sheer stoke of being alive afterwards. In South Africa, you also kotch, park a tiger, blow chunks or make a technicoloured yawn. ‘We scored a betters section*.’ BILTONG Dried raw meat. Specially prepared dried raw meat made from beef, venison or ostrich. Still in use, but fading away in the new South Africa. BOTTOM TURN The initial turn off the bottom of the wave after you take off. Perhaps the biggest semantic gift given to the world by South Africa? AG (U-GH) This multi-purpose interjection precedes any sentence for an emotive effect, such as ‘Ag, no man’ (sign of irritation), or the more neutral, ‘Ag, I don’t know.’ It can also be a stand-alone expletive. If you are aggro, you bring bad karma into the water. Lank* younger surfers use this old mariner’s greeting. AIKONA (eye-kor-na, sometimes hi-kor-na, and eye-kor-na if very emphatic) Means ‘No way’, ‘Absolutely not’ (Xhosa or Zulu). (eye-tah) Greeting that originated amidst the township youth. You braai with wood in a metal drum or between bricks.

If you are facing the wave, you’re surfing frontside. ‘This chow is kiff ek sê*.’ ‘I just had such a kiff wave.’ Can be pronounced keef (drawing out the syllable). ‘You have lank* marcha* for the larny* kittes ek sê*.’ KLAP (klup) Hit, slap (Afrikaans). ‘Ek sal jou a snotklap gee.’ (I will hit you hard enough to make the snot fly.) ‘Let’s klap another Klippies*.’ KLIPPIES AND COKE Brandy and Coke. ‘He’s such a larny.’ ‘You are wearing larny clothes.’ ‘Why are you dressed so larny? Down in the Eastern Cape, when the party is ripping, and everyone starts getting all soppy and sentimental, they might start calling each other ‘legends’.

You cook your boerewors*, steak, lamb chops and sosaties* on a grid over the flames.

You eat mielie pap*, salads, rolls and other stuff.

A goofed action is when you do something stupid because you’re goofed*. Rabid racists in the past have miraculously become PC. Usually induced by adrenalin, feeling wired or high on fear, either before paddling into a huge ocean, or the sheer stoke of being alive afterwards. In South Africa, you also kotch, park a tiger, blow chunks or make a technicoloured yawn. ‘We scored a betters section*.’ BILTONG Dried raw meat. Specially prepared dried raw meat made from beef, venison or ostrich. Still in use, but fading away in the new South Africa. BOTTOM TURN The initial turn off the bottom of the wave after you take off. Perhaps the biggest semantic gift given to the world by South Africa?

AG (U-GH) This multi-purpose interjection precedes any sentence for an emotive effect, such as ‘Ag, no man’ (sign of irritation), or the more neutral, ‘Ag, I don’t know.’ It can also be a stand-alone expletive. If you are aggro, you bring bad karma into the water. Lank* younger surfers use this old mariner’s greeting. AIKONA (eye-kor-na, sometimes hi-kor-na, and eye-kor-na if very emphatic) Means ‘No way’, ‘Absolutely not’ (Xhosa or Zulu). (eye-tah) Greeting that originated amidst the township youth. You braai with wood in a metal drum or between bricks.

Many people own bakkies in SA, particularly in the rural areas. The word comes from the ‘Berg’ (Mountain) of Table Mountain, where bergies lived under bushes or in caves. You might see them wrapped in a blanket wrapped around a bottle of booze in a doorway. Favourites are Marie, Romany Creams, Nuttikrust and Eet Sum Mor. ‘Bru, that’s blind – you scaled* my Britney Spears poster.’ BLOW CHUNKS, see bark the dog BOATMAN Paddleskier, also eggbeater, windmill, goatboat. COOL Like kiff and lekker, a universal word that refers to things hip, okay, good and nice. DOENING IT A mutated English variant on the Afrikaans word ‘doen’ which means ‘do’. ‘The surf was doening it.’ DOF (dôf) Dull, stupid (Afrikaans). ‘You doffie.’ DOLOS (dôlôss) This large H-shaped concrete block – with a mass of up to 20 tons – was invented in East London in the early 1960s and is used in breakwaters and piers around South Africa. Normally associated with a cracked, parched mouth and thwollen tongue when you have thmoked too muth doobie*, or drunk too much tassies*.