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13-Jan-2018 09:05

The message is that we really are obsessed with how we look.

If we were all the body equivalent of colorblind, we wouldn't have any of these shows." Balanced between the approaches is the young, toned, waxed, wrinkle-free, catwalk-ready body type celebrated and adored by Hollywood executives.

For 10 months cameras have been following her around 10 to 12 hours a day, and in the past eight months she’s lost an additional 112 pounds. I wanted to find out the reason I got to 700 pounds.” She’s still not entirely sure what made her eat so much, though she says “I have an addiction.

When Oprah asked what it was like to be a star, Ruby said “I’m not a big star, I’m just losing weight and everybody can relate.” She says she started her weight loss journey because “I just want to tell the truth . There’s something wrong with me.” She notes that she’s always been a pretty happy person, but she thinks there may be something lurking in her past that is a key to her weight gain — she says she can’t remember anything that happened in her life before the age of 13.

"The appeal of the weight-loss shows is the old American reinvention theme: reinventing yourself by chasing that ideal," Thompson said.

"Then we have shows about accepting plus-size people.

"The only thing that's mixed is the approach to it.There's the notion that large women are self-hating and unlovable, not confident women who believe in their own worth." And does America even need a dose of consciousness raising when it comes to fat acceptance?Overweight characters and personalities have been accepted and beloved by TV viewers for 60 years. The examples are far fewer, to be sure, but, after Berg, America had no problem accepting Esther Rolle as the mother on "Good Times," Delta Burke when she put on a few pounds in "Designing Women," Wendie Jo Sperber on "Babes," Roseanne Barr as the star of the No.All of that isn't summed up by your dress size." She finds less to love about "More to Love." "Beware reality shows bearing enlightened messages," said Pozner, who is working on a book titled "Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV." "Most reality shows would like us to think they're about liberation and fat acceptance, but, what they're doing is co-opting the language of acceptance to sell us back the same stereotypes about overweight women as lazy, pathetic and desperate." Pozner has less of a problem with "The Biggest Loser" and "Dance Your Ass Off" because they take a coed approach and emphasize health issues."The text of 'More to Love' is that, oh, we believe women should be loved even if they're larger," she said.

"The only thing that's mixed is the approach to it.There's the notion that large women are self-hating and unlovable, not confident women who believe in their own worth." And does America even need a dose of consciousness raising when it comes to fat acceptance?Overweight characters and personalities have been accepted and beloved by TV viewers for 60 years. The examples are far fewer, to be sure, but, after Berg, America had no problem accepting Esther Rolle as the mother on "Good Times," Delta Burke when she put on a few pounds in "Designing Women," Wendie Jo Sperber on "Babes," Roseanne Barr as the star of the No.All of that isn't summed up by your dress size." She finds less to love about "More to Love." "Beware reality shows bearing enlightened messages," said Pozner, who is working on a book titled "Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV." "Most reality shows would like us to think they're about liberation and fat acceptance, but, what they're doing is co-opting the language of acceptance to sell us back the same stereotypes about overweight women as lazy, pathetic and desperate." Pozner has less of a problem with "The Biggest Loser" and "Dance Your Ass Off" because they take a coed approach and emphasize health issues."The text of 'More to Love' is that, oh, we believe women should be loved even if they're larger," she said.That's a lesson lost on the people running television." Over the last year, there has been no shortage of openings in the Cleveland dining scene.