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01-Oct-2018 18:34

Many people over 50 find themselves hanging on to their jobs for dear life, aware that they are perceived as obsolete and not as valuable as younger workers, despite their vast experience and institutional knowledge.

According to a 2013 AARP survey report, "more than one-third of older workers are not confident that they would find another job right away without having to take a pay cut or move (37%).

The idea that after a certain age you can’t do demanding tasks is just a myth, says Applewhite, noting that even during slavery, the market price for slaves remained high well into their 70s, because slave owners knew they could do valuable work.

The stereotype that older workers can’t adjust to technology is similarly overstated, she says, noting that they are usually more than capable of learning new technical skills, particularly if those skills have relevance to their work experience.

First Jan applied for positions similar to her previous employment at banks and other financial institutions. Keeping upbeat, she widened the net, applying for all marketing and communications jobs advertised in a 40-mile radius of her home. Finally, she started applying for retail jobs and was shocked to find that she could not even land these.

Jan got an interview at Barnes & Noble, but the store didn’t call her back, and she wondered if all the young people on the floor had something to do with it.

The most common myth is that older workers are all the same. A group of 20-year-olds is much more alike than a group of 60-year-olds. “Older workers go more slowly, but they’re more accurate.

Lead researcher Isla Rippon of University College London told Reuters that such day-to-day experiences impact physical and mental health: “Frequent perceived discrimination may be a chronic source of stress and build up over time, leading to social withdrawal and reluctance to go to the doctor.”When it comes to financial stress, older Americans say that job insecurity is their number-one concern, according to a recent survey.Shouldn’t people have the choice ­— the right to continue to work if they want to?Nobody wants to be economically dependent.” The trouble comes when older workers are shunted aside or can’t find decent jobs, and then face a shredded social safety net.She tried a local bridal shop, thinking that she was the same age as the mothers of the brides and would be a good fit. Even Target turned her down for a job as a store clerk. That’s when she started to panic.“It’s been difficult on my family,” Jan says.“My husband was a lawyer, but he has become disabled. Then I got thrown away.”In researching this article, I heard many stories like Jan’s, from Americans from all walks of life.

Lead researcher Isla Rippon of University College London told Reuters that such day-to-day experiences impact physical and mental health: “Frequent perceived discrimination may be a chronic source of stress and build up over time, leading to social withdrawal and reluctance to go to the doctor.”When it comes to financial stress, older Americans say that job insecurity is their number-one concern, according to a recent survey.Shouldn’t people have the choice ­— the right to continue to work if they want to?Nobody wants to be economically dependent.” The trouble comes when older workers are shunted aside or can’t find decent jobs, and then face a shredded social safety net.She tried a local bridal shop, thinking that she was the same age as the mothers of the brides and would be a good fit. Even Target turned her down for a job as a store clerk. That’s when she started to panic.“It’s been difficult on my family,” Jan says.“My husband was a lawyer, but he has become disabled. Then I got thrown away.”In researching this article, I heard many stories like Jan’s, from Americans from all walks of life.In every corner of America, millions of people are terrified of losing their jobs and falling into financial ruin. This is not just a story of people in their 60s or 70s.