Non intimidating body language

12-Apr-2018 03:20

Clare Thompson Teacher-Human Services Skills Institute - Tasmania I did a 1 hour workshop where I presented your Facts and Feelings Listening Exercise.We learned so much about how we listen and the consequences of not listening well that I was asked to purchase your book and have another Listening Meeting.I am a teacher with the Skills Institute in Tasmania and I'm about to roll out communication training in Tasmania's only youth detention facility.I have an enormous amount of material regarding communication but none as succinct or as user-friendly as what you have developed....."the reason to learn about the science of interpreting body language is to create rapport with the people you work with.

The research proves otherwise - that there are not consistent non-verbal behaviours shown by people who lie....by those who tell the truth.

(Or why, when we consider 'interpreting body language' to be a science, it creates assumptions and generalisations that lead to disconnection between us.) I was in a conversation the other day and noticed - some people call it 'interpreting body language' - how I was standing.

I had my arms folded and my legs were also crossed as I stood leaning against the photocopier at work.

Are you experiencing difficulties communicating with someone?

Perhaps at work with your boss, or your colleagues, or at home with your partner, children or other family members?

The research proves otherwise - that there are not consistent non-verbal behaviours shown by people who lie....by those who tell the truth.

(Or why, when we consider 'interpreting body language' to be a science, it creates assumptions and generalisations that lead to disconnection between us.) I was in a conversation the other day and noticed - some people call it 'interpreting body language' - how I was standing.

I had my arms folded and my legs were also crossed as I stood leaning against the photocopier at work.

Are you experiencing difficulties communicating with someone?

Perhaps at work with your boss, or your colleagues, or at home with your partner, children or other family members?

Interpreting body language is an example of a way in which this way of avoiding communicating has started to become formalised. And this is reinforced by the portrayal of communication as a 'science', in which we believe we can generalise about people's feelings and thoughts when they stand in a certain way or speak with a certain tone, or wear a certain coloured jumper etc.